Navigation
Download the AMN app for your mobile device today - FREE!
  •  

Service in America’s Navy can be a plus-up for civilian employment

Navy Veteran Kendrick Cowans, of Anderson, S.C., is employed as an orthopedic technician with Texas Orthopedics. Cowans, who served in America’s Navy from 1997 to 2019, was a hospital corpsman (HM) and a Navy recruiter. (U.S. Navy photo by Burrell Parmer, Navy Recruiting District San Antonio Public Affairs/Released)
April 22, 2020

This report originally published at dvidshub.net (DVIDS) and is reprinted in accordance with DVIDS guidelines and copyright guidance.

AUSTIN, Texas – Service in America’s Navy not only can benefit many with the propensity to serve, but can also be beneficial to those who seek employment after military service. This was the case regarding Kendrick Cowans, of Anderson, S.C., who served in the Navy as a hospital corpsman (HM).

Cowans, a 1997 graduate of Westside High School in Anderson, joined America’s Navy in September 1997. Initially, he was classified as a submariner, but due to his high stature, he was reclassified to serve in the hospital corpsman career field.

During his 21-year career in America’s Navy, Cowans served at Navy Medical Center Portsmouth, Va.; National Medical Center Bethesda, Md.; Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C.; and overseas in Germany.

His last duty was as a recruiter assigned to Navy Recruiting Station Texas City with Navy Talent Acquisition Group (NTAG) Houston.

“Being a recruiter was challenging,” said Cowans. “But once I learned the process, it became something I loved and became very successful at.”

- ADVERTISEMENT -

According Cowans, he recruited more than 100 people into the Navy and was instrumental in his station earning NTAG Houston’s Small Station of the Year in 2016.

Additionally, he earned recruiter of the month recognition for several months.

After his service, Cowans began working as an orthopedic technician in Houston. He applied for other jobs and was called upon to work at Texas Orthopedics in February.

“They looked at my experience as a Navy corpsman and I believe it gave me the advantage over others,” said Cowans. “Everything I learned in the Navy prepared me for employment in my civilian life.”

Asked what he missed the most about his past service, Cowans said, “One thing I missed about being in the Navy is traveling. I loved being assigned to different locations and experiencing various environments.”

America’s Navy is still hiring amid COVID-19. Those interested in joining the Navy in Central and South Texas can contact a recruiter by visiting www.navy.com or through Facebook: Navy Recruiting District San Antonio.

Sailors can still expect to receive full benefits like health insurance, competitive pay and housing stipends and can continue to qualify for up to $40,000 in enlistment bonuses.

Whether a person has never served before, or want to serve the country again in a time of great need, there is a place for them in America’s Navy.

NRD San Antonio’s area of responsibility includes more than 34 Navy Recruiting Stations and Navy Officer Recruiting Stations spread throughout 144,000 square miles of Central and South Texas territory.

Dvidshub.net (DVIDS) reports are created independently of American Military News and are distributed by American Military News in accordance with DVIDS guidelines and copyright guidance. Use of DVIDS reports does not imply DVIDS endorsement of American Military News. American Military News is a privately owned media company and has no affiliation with the U.S. Department of Defense.