Navigation
Download the AMN app for your mobile device today - FREE!
  •  

Recce Town Airman using EOD capabilities to make PPE

Senior Airman Jace Zook, 9th Civil Engineer Squadron Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) technician, poses for a photo on Beale Air Force Base, California, April 10, 2020. Zook discovered that the EOD Flight had the capability to create face shields. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman Jason W. Cochran)
April 15, 2020

This report originally published at dvidshub.net (DVIDS) and is reprinted in accordance with DVIDS guidelines and copyright guidance.

During normal operations the 9th Civil Engineer Squadron (CES) Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) flight disposes of unexploded munitions that pose a danger to Beale or the surrounding community.

Senior Airman Jace Zook, 9th CES EOD technician, has found a way to use EOD Flight’s capabilities to help Recce Town’s medical health professionals.

The EOD flight has a 3D printer to create training aides which can be used to practice procedures that destroy the aide itself, said Zook. The purpose of this training aid is to ultimately save the flight time and money.

After a conversation with his mother about a shortage of personal protective equipment (PPE) for healthcare professionals, Zook began to think about how he can help. It wasn’t until a peer posted something to social media that he found a way to do just that.

“A friend of mine in another EOD shop posted to social media that he was able to make an N95 mask with their 3D printer,” said Zook. “I reached out to him, he was super helpful by sending me the files and showing me how to do it. I thought about what my mom said and wanted to see if there was a way to make the face masks too. I googled it and sure enough there were plenty of options to choose from, so I started making prototypes.”

- ADVERTISEMENT -

After coordinating with the 9th Medical Group to see if there was an actual need for face shields, he found a design that fit their criteria and started making them. The first delivery will consist of 30 face shields.

“The Air Force is big on innovation,” said Zook. “We identified there was a shortage, and we are doing what we can with what we have to come up with a solution. We’re helping out how we can.”

Dvidshub.net (DVIDS) reports are created independently of American Military News and are distributed by American Military News in accordance with DVIDS guidelines and copyright guidance. Use of DVIDS reports does not imply DVIDS endorsement of American Military News. American Military News is a privately owned media company and has no affiliation with the U.S. Department of Defense.