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Brother of Capitol Police officer killed in riot outside Congress speaks out: ‘Brian is a hero’

United States Capitol Police Officer Brian D. Sicknick. (United States Capitol Police photo/released)
January 13, 2021

The brother of the Capitol Police officer killed in the rioting on the steps of Congress wants the nation to know Brian Sicknick was a military veteran who died a “hero.”

Officer Sicknick, 42, was mortally wounded by a fire extinguisher or metal pipe smashed on his head while defending the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday. He was one of five people — and the only officer — killed in the rush on the halls of Congress.

A murder investigation has been launched as the FBI also seeks others who overwhelmed police.

The officer’s brother, Ken Sicknick, said in a statement he shared with the Herald early Friday that the New Jersey family is heartbroken.

“Brian is a hero and that is what we would like people to remember,” said Ken Sicknick.

“My brother was the youngest of three sons born to my parents in South River, NJ, … and wanted to be a police officer his entire life,” Ken Sicknick added.

“He joined the New Jersey Air National Guard as a means to that end. In doing so, he served his country honorably in both Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Desert Shield, of which my family is very proud,” the brother said.

“While stateside during those years, Brian served as an SP for the 108th Air Refueling Wing out of Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst in New Jersey. Brian transitioned to the (Capitol Police) in 2008, serving there in support of our country for the past 12 years,” Ken Sicknick added.

Brian Sicknick was deployed to Saudi Arabia while in the Air National Guard, then to Kyrgyzstan, the family said.

They added Brian rescued “Dachshunds in his spare time” and “enjoyed relaxing at home and watching movies.” He was a “private person,” they added, who was a New Jersey Devils hockey fan.

“Many details regarding Wednesday’s events and the direct causes of Brian’s injuries remain unknown and our family asks the public and the press to respect our wishes in not making Brian’s passing a political issue,” Ken Sicknick said in his statement.

“Please honor Brian’s life and service and respect our privacy while we move forward in doing the same,” the brother added.

Brian Sicknick was among the first officers on the steps on Congress to take on the crowd rushing to disrupt the Electoral College vote count to certify President-elect Joe Biden’s victory. He was outside with fellow officers seen trying to hold back the swarm of protesters.

His family, the brother added in the statement while also texting a family photo of Brian to the Herald, want Brian’s lasting memory to be one of a country he served on so many levels.

“The family also would like to express their gratitude to Brian’s law enforcement family for their kindness, compassion and support during this difficult time,” Ken Sicknick said of fellow Capitol Police officers.

Brian Sicknick leaves behind both his parents, Charles and Gladys, two brothers, Ken and Craig, and his longtime girlfriend of 11 years, Sandra Garza.

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(c) 2021 the Boston Herald

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