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Aftermath Videos: 38 missing after deadly tornadoes hit Tennessee

People stand outside the Basement East music venue in East Nashville after it was destroyed by a tornado on Tuesday, March 3, 2020. (Courtney Pedroza/The Tennessean/TNS)
March 04, 2020

The death toll has risen to 24 and 38 still remain missing after multiple tornadoes touched down in and around Nashville, Tenn. on Tuesday morning.

The Tennessee Emergency Management Agency (TEMA), announced the latest death toll from the storms on Wednesday. The state remains uncertain about the overall damage totals from the storms which passed through Nashville, and heavily affected other nearby counties.

Video of the storm was captured by one crane operator stuck in his cabin as a tornado touched down in Nashville early Tuesday morning.

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Two fatalities have been reported in Davidson County, whose capital city is Nashville. Three fatalities have been reported in Wilson County and one more in Benton County. Thus far, Putnam County has seen the highest number of fatalities at 18.

Tuesday’s tornadoes were the deadliest in the U.S. in seven years and in Putnam county, 38 people still remain unaccounted for, CNN reported. The last deadliest event occurred in Moore, Oklahoma in May of 2013. Hundreds of buildings were also reportedly destroyed in the storms and approximately 40,000 are without power.

Hundreds of volunteers could be seen gathered in Cookeville in Putnam County to assist in cleanup efforts.

Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee has declared a state of emergency for the state. The current emergency management status is at Level 3, indicating a serious emergency or minor disaster has occurred. The most severe emergency status is a Level 1, catastrophic disaster requiring large scale state and federal assistance and an immediate military involvement. Level 5 is the least severe emergency status and indicates normal conditions.

It remains unclear how many tornadoes formed as a result of the Tuesday storm. Initial estimates indicated EF-3 tornado damage around in the eastern parts of Nashville.

All Metro Nashville Public Schools and afterschool programs were reportedly closed for Wednesday and at least two schools will not be able to reopen immediately as repairs could take days for one school and several weeks for the other.

Tennessee, which was among the Super Tuesday states also saw voting stations affected by the storms. A judge ordered five polling sites to remain open until 10 p.m. on Tuesday after several top Democratic campaigns filed a lawsuit to extend the primary voting.