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Watch 2 F-35 & 2 F-18 fighter jets perform Super Bowl flyover

F-35B Lightning II assigned to the “Warlords” of Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron 501 (VMFAT 501), F/A-18E Super Hornets assigned to the “Vigilantes” of Strike Fighter Squadron 151 (VFA 151), and F-35C Lightning II assigned to the “Argonauts” of Strike Fighter Squadron 147 (VFA 147) fly in formation over Hard Rock Stadium. The four squadrons are part of the joint-service flyover for Super Bowl LIV. (U.S. Navy Video by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Chelsea D. Meiller)
February 03, 2020

Four U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps fighter jets performed the traditional flyover for Super Bowl LIV on Sunday ahead of the San Francisco 49ers and Kansas City Chiefs.

The flyover over Hard Rock Stadium consisted of an F-35B Lightning II from “Warlords” of Marine Fighter Attack Training Squadron 501 (VMFAT 501), two F/A-18E Super Hornets assigned to the “Vigilantes” of Strike Fighter Squadron 151 (VFA 151), and an F-35C Lightning II assigned to the “Argonauts” of Strike Fighter Squadron 147 (VFA 147).

The fighter jets took off from Homestead Air Reserve Base and appeared over the stadium in diamond formation at the end of the National Anthem, sang by recording artist Demi Lovato.

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“These are operational aircraft, so we just got back off deployment in May, and we’re out there flying missions day in and day out,” U.S. Navy Commander Chad Heirigs told WSVN News on Friday. “It’s just airspeed and distance and hitting that time on target to the exact second.”

On Friday, the fighter jets arrived at Homestead Air Reserve Base to prepare for the flyover.

Another video showed the fighter jets taking off for a practice flight.

Pilots Cmdr. Desobry Bowens and Maj. Adam Wellington spoke with NFL analysts on Friday ahead of the game and explained they were lucky to be in the “right place” to be chosen for the Super Bowl flyover. They also likened the flyover practice to real-world missions.

“This is very much in line with the kind of work we already train for and do,” Bowens said. “Being on time, on target first pass, is our goal when we’re in combat operations. We leverage that skill

Wellington explained that this flyover is unique from previous years because it utilizes operational aircraft. These four fighter jets were previously deployed and will deploy again.

Usually, the demonstration teams, the U.S. Navy Blue Angels and the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds, are used in flyovers.

The U.S. Navy and the U.S. Air Force also alternate Super Bowl flyovers. The Air Force