Navigation
Download the AMN app for your mobile device today - FREE!

FBI agents’ texts reveal Hillary Clinton probe likely fixed – here’s what they say

Hillary Clinton (YouTube)
January 26, 2018

The FBI is still coming under scrutiny, as some of the newly found text messages between two FBI officials have been released, and they show that the agents were apprehensive about going after Hillary Clinton.

And on Friday, Republican lawmakers responded to the messages, House Oversight Committee Chairman Trey Gowdy telling Fox News that it “doesn’t appear anyone wanted her charged.”

“Now we know the fix was in, and I think the logical thing is, if the fix was in on the Clinton investigation, and if these same people — the top people at the FBI — started and ran the Trump-Russia investigation, might there be some bad things going on there as well,” Rep. Jim Jordan asked while on Fox and Friends on Friday. “And as you look at these text messages, it sure looks like there is.”

The Justice Department just this week said it has found thousands of text messages between FBI officials that mysteriously went missing.

There were five months’ worth of messages, from December 2016 to May 2017, between FBI officials Peter Strzok and Lisa Page that were reported missing over the weekend.

Strzok and Page are said to have exchanged more than 50,000 text messages during the 2016 Presidential election. The agency also investigated then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s mishandling of government emails in 2014, and the two were apparently concerned about going after Clinton in the event she would become President.

Clinton turned over about 30,000 emails to the State Department in 2014, following Freedom of Information Act requests. The requests came after officials discovered that Clinton had sent emails using her personal email account, rather than her secure government account, during her tenure as U.S. Secretary of State.

Clinton’s emails and email etiquette were a prominent talking point of the 2016 Presidential Election, when Clinton ran against and lost to Donald Trump.

“One more thing: she [Clinton] might be our next president,” Page texted Strzok on Feb. 25, 2016, Fox News reported Thursday.

“The last thing you need [is] going in there loaded for bear,” Page also wrote. “You think she’s going to remember or care that it was more [DOJ] than [FBI]?”

Fox also pointed out:

Strzok not only worked on the Clinton case, but was assigned to the special counsel’s probe into Russia and the Trump campaign after a number of anti-Trump texts were discovered on his phone. Page also briefly worked on the special counsel investigation.

The messages span what has been described as a crucial time for the agency – the transition from a government run by then-President Barack Obama, a Democrat, and now-President Trump, a Republican. The texts reportedly provide proof that the FBI had a bias against President Trump, and that the Russia investigation is also biased against the President.

The texts – and the FBI itself – have come under intense scrutiny, as Republican lawmakers continue to call for the release of a scandalous memo that is said to reveal an extreme bias against the Trump Administration.

There is no ignoring the now-infamous memo written by House Intelligence Committee Republicans that purportedly reveals a shocking high-level conspiracy. Politicians are demanding it be released, but the FBI and the Justice Department are much more hesitant, especially in light of the recent text message fiasco, where thousands of messages between FBI officials apparently went missing.

The memo and text messages are said to reveal conspiracy among some of the highest echelons of government, involving the FBI plotting to spy on and upend President Donald Trump and his administration.

While Democrats are now saying the “#ReleaseTheMemo” movement is merely a distraction from the current federal investigation into Russian interference in the Presidential election, Republican politicians have been front and center pushing for the memo to be published.