U.S. Space Command Creates New Militarized Framework For Interstellar Warfare – American Military News

U.S. Space Command Creates New Militarized Framework For Interstellar Warfare

Air Force Space Command is seeking new ways to take interstellar warfare to the next level by creating a new framework called Space Enterprise Vision.

Air Force Space Command spokesman Col. John Dorrian told Sputnik News that SEV is “an all-encompassing look at all the things we need to do to create more resilience in our space forces, enhance them, and respond to threats.”

“Most U.S. military space systems were not designed with threats in mind, and were built for long-term functionality and efficiency, with systems operating for decades in some cases,” Gen. John Hyten, head of Air Force Space Command said in an Air Force release.

The Air Force story said that SEV is designed to “measure how well space enterprise forces can respond to the full range of known threats, and how quickly they can adapt to counter future threats, while continuing to deliver space effects to joint and coalition warfighter.”

“It is good that the US government is finally getting serious about national security space. For a long time, there has been a lot of talk and not a lot of walk,” senior research scholar at the University of Maryland’s Center for International and Security Studies, Theresa Hitchens told Sputnik News. Hitchens thinks that a program such as SEV should have been created years ago.

Hitchens said that she is optimistic about SEV and says it will include, “cooperation with allies to help with redundancy, resiliency, [and] distribution of assets for mission assurance,” as well as bridging the gap between the Intelligence community and the military for space assets, and better space situational awareness.

“Space assets have for too long been allowed to be near ‘single point’ failures. This is not good, neither for the United States nor for international security, because it creates incentives for others to target those assets,” Hitchens said.

In order to gain air space superiority, something more than an F-22 is necessary Gen. John Hyten said. “The first thing you have to do to gain air superiority is make sure you can fly where you need to fly, that means we have to take down an enemy air defense system,” he said.

Hitchens is worried that the focus on combat capabilities will take precedence and lead to conflict between the aggressive “big three space players.”