3 More Military Badasses You NEED To Know – American Military News

3 More Military Badasses You NEED To Know

American Military News wants to share with you stories of men who were so badass that it will blow your mind. We’re talking incredible acts of courage and tenacity that for many would be unthinkable, but for our troops, comes naturally.

Here are today’s three badass vets.

howard

Name: Sgt. Seth E. Howard

Conflict: Afghanistan

Story: “On 6 April 2008, Sergeant Howard heroically fought for over an hour up a mountain while under intense Insurgent fire to rescue wounded members of his ODA pinned down by Insurgent fire.

Sergeant Howard was fixed in a wadi by heavy sniper, Rocket Propelled Grenade, small arms and machine gun fire on initial contact.

Without hesitation, Sergeant Howard directed his Afghan Commandos to fire on Insurgent positions while he engaged numerous positions with his sniper rifle and an 84 millimeter recoilless rifle.

His accurate suppressive fire killed numerous Insurgent fighters and drew fire on his position, allowing the command and control (C2) element to move to covered positions.

Sergeant Howard left his covered position and heroically fought across a 60 foot cliff under intense fire from multiple locations after hearing that the C2 element received two critically wounding ODA members and were in danger of being overrun.”

brucecrandrall

Name: Bruce P. Crandall

Conflict: Vietnam

Story: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty: Major Bruce P. Crandall distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism as a Flight Commander in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 229th Assault Helicopter Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). On 14 November 1965, his flight of sixteen helicopters was lifting troops for a search and destroy mission from Plei Me, Vietnam, to Landing Zone X-Ray in the Ia Drang Valley. On the fourth troop lift, the airlift began to take enemy fire, and by the time the aircraft had refueled and returned for the next troop lift, the enemy had Landing Zone X-Ray targeted. As Major Crandall and the first eight helicopters landed to discharge troops on his fifth troop lift, his unarmed helicopter came under such intense enemy fire that the ground commander ordered the second flight of eight aircraft to abort their mission. As Major Crandall flew back to Plei Me, his base of operations, he determined that the ground commander of the besieged infantry battalion desperately needed more ammunition. Major Crandall then decided to adjust his base of operations to Artillery Firebase Falcon in order to shorten the flight distance to deliver ammunition and evacuate wounded soldiers.While medical evacuation was not his mission, he immediately sought volunteers and with complete disregard for his own personal safety, led the two aircraft to Landing Zone X-Ray. Despite the fact that the landing zone was still under relentless enemy fire, Major Crandall landed and proceeded to supervise the loading of seriously wounded soldiers aboard his aircraft. Major Crandall’s voluntary decision to land under the most extreme fire instilled in the other pilots the will and spirit to continue to land their own aircraft, and in the ground forces the realization that they would be resupplied and that friendly wounded would be promptly evacuated. This greatly enhanced morale and the will to fight at a critical time. After his first medical evacuation, Major Crandall continued to fly into and out of the landing zone throughout the day and into the evening. That day he completed a total of 22 flights, most under intense enemy fire, retiring from the battlefield only after all possible service had been rendered to the Infantry battalion. His actions provided critical resupply of ammunition and evacuation of the wounded. Major Crandall’s daring acts of bravery and courage in the face of an overwhelming and determined enemy are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

marcus_luttrell_navy_seal_in_afghanistan_prior_to_red_wing

Name: Marcus Luttrell

Conflict: Afghanistan

Story: “The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Petty Officer Marcus Luttrell, United States Navy, for extraordinary heroism in actions against the enemy while serving in a four-man Special Reconnaissance element with SEAL Delivery Vehicle Team ONE, Naval Special Warfare Task unit, Afghanistan from 27 to 28 June 2005, in the vicinity of Asadabad, Konar Province, Afghanistan. Operating in the middle of an enemy-controlled area, in extremely rugged terrain, his Special Reconnaissance element was tasked with locating a high-level Anti-Coalition Militia leader, in support of a follow-on direct action mission to disrupt enemy activity. On 28 June 2005, the element was spotted by Anti-Coalition Militia sympathizers, who immediately revealed their position to the militia fighters. As a result, the element directly encountered the enemy. Demonstrating exceptional resolve and fully understanding the gravity of the situation and his responsibility to his teammates, the unidentified SEAL fought valiantly against the numerically superior and positionally advantaged enemy force.”

Read More At Bro Bible